Africa Today blog

The flagship African show in Press TV

Archive for May 19th, 2010

What’s the road ahead after Sudan’s historic elections?

Posted by AT on May 19, 2010

Africa Today 57
Topic: What’s the road ahead after Sudan’s historic elections?
Broadcasting date: 18th May 2010
Presenter: Vuyiswa
Guests:

1- Ahmed Diraige, Former Governor, Darfur

2- Dr Khalid AlMubarak, Media Counsellor, Sudan Embassy

Description:
Many are concerned about Al-Bashir’s legitimacy to rule after disputed elections in April. Now the country faces some tough times ahead to deal with problems in the South of the country and the general feeling among Southerners about Omar al-Bashir’s government.

part 1

Brief:
At least eight people have been killed when mutinous troops attacked an army base in south Sudan following this month’s elections, officials say.
A southern army spokesman said the mutineers backed a former general who ran and lost in a Jonglei state poll.
George Athor denied leading the troops but told the BBC he sympathised with them and said the polls were rigged.
The ex-rebel SPLM party won a landslide victory to retain power in the south, amid widespread claims of intimidation.
The 11-15 April elections were the first in 24 years – and the first since the end of a two-decade conflict between north and south.
The BBC’s James Copnall in Khartoum says there have been intense negotiations for several days to avoid just this sort of problem in Southern Sudan.

part 2

Hear: Sudan now faces some of the toughest times in its history after general elections held this year.

See: SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Dr. Amina Osman, National Congress Party activist:
“The people of Sudan have nominated the National Congress Party to lead this nation towards peace, security and unity.”

Hear: Shortly after the elections there have been reported attacks on an army base in southern Sudan and fighting in West Darfur. The most serious of the recent developments is the attacks on West Darfur which The Justice and Equality Movement, one of Darfur’s biggest rebel groups, blame on the army. The group has decided to boycott peace talks with the government and threatened war if the offensive continued. Recent voting in the country did not take place in large parts of Darfur and Southern Sudan. The government had been working hard to prevent the latest events and this twist highlights the deep divisions within the country. Africa Today now finds out if the recent election results had any effect on resolving the conflicts in the Sudan region.

part 3

VT2

Hear: Sudan’s elections this year was the first in 24years and widely deemed free and fair by African Union observers. President Omar al Bashir of the National Congress Party, who stood against eleven other candidates, was declared the winner with 68.24% of the total vote.
SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Abel Alier, head of Sudan’s National Elections Commission:
“The winner to the position of President of the Republic of Sudan is Omar Hassan Ahmed Al-Bashir from the National Congress: 5 million votes with a 68 percent win.”
Hear: In Southern Sudan, which is semi autonomous, Salva Kiir of the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement won the presidency with a 93% of the total votes cast there. Even though some opposition members boycotted the elections, it was largely peaceful. Now keeping the peace after the elections is the question on many Sudanese minds and South Sudan’s expected elections for independence, next year.

AF57 Emails and texts

Emails:
Tobechukwu Tobechi -Nigeria

I suggest you reposition away from the usual western media demonization through negative reports on Africa, by emphasizing new developments and transformations on the continent in the field of technology, leadership, higher education, ICT, and industrialization. Western television stations are shunned by most Africans as conspiracy mechanisms. But press TV can make a difference if it wants and people are quietly watching.

Simon Hagos -Asmara

Explicitly the problem in Somalia has traveled from bad to worst. Many innocent people are dying because of malnutrition and children have suffered a lot for nothing, such problem is because of the western intervention like USA on the domestic issue of Somalia. That’s why you should air some programmes by inviting some experts from the region. The issue of Somalia is part and parcel of African issue.
Joseph

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Has Egypt the right to still lay hold of a colonial agreement on the Nile?

Posted by AT on May 19, 2010

Africa Today 56
Topic: Has Egypt the right to still lay hold of a colonial agreement on the Nile?
Broadcasting date: 11th May 2010
Presenter: Vuyiswa
Guests:
1- Dr Wafik Moustafa
Chair, Conservative Arab network

2- Vincent Magombe
Director, Africa Inform International

Watch the whole episode on Press TV website

Description:
Sudan and Egypt’s refusal over revision of 1959 colonial treaty on the distribution and use of the Nile waters.

Brief:
Countries of the Nile Basin Initiative must call Egypt’s bluff. The North African country is threatening to withdraw from the pact if the other Nile Basin partners sign a new Co-operation Framework Agreement.
The new agreement is meant to replace the lopsided colonial-era treaty that gave Egypt extraordinary monopoly over the use of Nile waters, while the countries from which the river originates were starved of the vital resource.
The previous agreement was signed in 1959 between Britain, the dominant colonial power then, and Egypt and Sudan.
Besides Ethiopia, the other countries now part of the pact — Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Burundi, Rwanda and Congo DR — were still under colonial rule, and at independence, inherited a Nile treaty heavily tilted in favour of Egypt and Sudan.
Egypt, in particular, has over the years employed the language of threats to retain its unjust hold over the Nile waters. Under the prevailing treaty, Egypt claims 55.5 billion cubic metres or 87 per cent of the Nile’s annual flow.
This means the countries downstream cannot tap the water for irrigation, domestic use, hydro-electric power or industrial use without Egypt’s permission.

A fierce tension is rising between Egypt and seven other countries along the Nile Basin over the issue of sharing of the Nile River. Ethiopia, Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Burundi, Rwanda and Congo DR are poised to sign a new pact on equitable use of the water without Egypt and Sudan, the two largest consumers of the Nile basin. The previous agreement signed in 1959 between colonial power Britain, Egypt and Sudan gave Egypt a monopoly over the use of Nile waters which has its source from Ethiopia. Africa Today examines whether Egypt is still justified in maintaining a colonial agreement that gives it the sole use of the Nile waters?

About 300 million people live along the Nile basin, with most living in Egypt. The other countries, except Ethiopia, inherited the 1959 Nile treaty heavily in favour of Egypt and Sudan. A new pact by these countries will however address this problem and allow them to be able to use the water for irrigation, domestic use, hydro-electric power without Egypt’s permission. With some of these countries allies of western powers, will Egypt be looking to Israel, a force in Egyptian politics, for support, in helping it enforce the colonial agreement.

Emails:

Viktor Moadana, Nigeria.

I must say big congratulations to the Tanzanian government for her good gesture towards the refugees’ naturalization. I hope the Tanzanian government will handle this properly.
I will also like to call on the AU (African Union) to support this good integration. It is indeed a mark of unity amongst Africans.

Nomleth Blackstar , South Africa
I am a South African & it is saddening that my country has been affected by division once again. I love my south Africans black or white but it is unfair when things go bad in South Africa, black people will be blamed for the wrong things. Why should we see colour when things go wrong? We are fighting each other instead of fighting the bad government who doesn’t care about the country.

Text:
Innocent, Zambia

I am a refugee living in Zambia. I thank Tanzanian’s government for the good job they have done for refugees. We hope Zambian government will do the same.

Moosa, South Africa
We in South Africa feel embarrassed when reading in the media about our president spending 80 million rand on junkets when the very people who voted him in are hungry and cold. What an embarrassment to the poor.

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